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Anne Brontë quotes Showing 1-30 of 307

“But he who dares not grasp the thorn
Should never crave the rose.”
Anne Bronte
“It is better to arm and strengthen your hero, than to disarm and enfeeble your foe.”
Anne Brontë
“Reading is my favourite occupation, when I have leisure for it and books to read.”
Anne Brontë, Agnes Grey
“I love the silent hour of night,
For blissful dreams may then arise,
Revealing to my charmed sight
What may not bless my waking eyes.”
Anne Brontë, Best Poems of the Brontë Sisters
“Smiles and tears are so alike with me, they are neither of them confined to any particular feelings: I often cry when I am happy, and smile when I am sad.”
Anne Brontë, The Tenant of Wildfell Hall
“It is foolish to wish for beauty. Sensible people never either desire it for themselves or care about it in others. If the mind be but well cultivated, and the heart well disposed, no one ever cares for the exterior.”
Anne Brontë, Agnes Grey
“I am satisfied that if a book is a good one, it is so whatever the sex of the author may be. All novels are or should be written for both men and women to read, and I am at a loss to conceive how a man should permit himself to write anything that would be really disgraceful to a woman, or why a woman should be censured for writing anything that would be proper and becoming for a man.”
Anne Brontë, The Tenant of Wildfell Hall
“I cannot love a man who cannot protect me.”
Anne Brontë
“What business had I to think of one that never thought of me?”
Anne Brontë, Agnes Grey
“His heart was like a sensitive plant, that opens for a moment in the sunshine, but curls up and shrinks into itself at the slightest touch of the finger, or the lightest breath of wind.”
Anne Brontë, The Tenant of Wildfell Hall
“I was sorry for her; I was amazed, disgusted at her heartless vanity; I wondered why so much beauty should be given to those who made so bad a use of it, and denied to some who would make it a benefit to both themselves and others.

But, God knows best, I concluded. There are, I suppose, some men as vain, as selfish, and as heartless as she is, and, perhaps, such women may be useful to punish them.”
Anne Brontë, Agnes Grey
“The ties that bind us to life are tougher than you imagine, or than any one can who has not felt how roughly they may be pulled without breaking.”
Anne Brontë, Agnes Grey
“I imagine there must be only a very, very few men in the world, that I should like to marry; and of those few, it is ten to one I may never be acquainted with one; or if I should, it is twenty to one he may not happen to be single, or to take a fancy to me.”
Anne Brontë, The Tenant of Wildfell Hall
“My heart is too thoroughly dried to be broken in a hurry, and I mean to live as long as I can.”
Anne Brontë, The Tenant of Wildfell Hall
“He had not breathed a word of love, or dropped one hint of tenderness or affection, and yet I had been supremely happy. To be near him, to hear him talk as he did talk, and to feel that he thought me worthy to be so spoken to - capable of understanding and duly appreciating such discourse - was enough.”
Anne Brontë, Agnes Grey
“What a fool you must be," said my head to my heart, or my sterner to my softer self.”
Anne bronte, Agnes Grey
“You may think it all very fine, Mr. Huntingdon, to amuse yourself with rousing my jealousy; but take care you don't rouse my hate instead. And when you have once extinguished my love, you will find it no easy matter to kindle it again.”
Anne Brontë, The Tenant of Wildfell Hall
“No, thank you, I don't mind the rain,' I said. I always lacked common sense when taken by surprise.”
Anne Brontë, Agnes Grey
“[B]eauty is that quality which, next to money, is generally the most attractive to the worst kinds of men; and, therefore, it is likely to entail a great deal of trouble on the possessor.”
Anne Brontë, The Tenant of Wildfell Hall
“My soul is awakened, my spirit is soaring and carried aloft on the wings of the breeze.”
Anne Brontë
“A little girl loves her bird--Why? Because it lives and feels; because it is helpless and harmless? A toad, likewise, lives and feels, and is equally helpless and harmless; but though she would not hurt a toad, she cannot love it like the bird, with its graceful form, soft feathers, and bright, speaking eyes.”
Anne Brontë, Agnes Grey
“When I tell you not to marry without love, I do not advise you to marry for love alone: there are many, many other things to be considered. Keep both heart and hand in your own possession, till you see good reason to part with them; and if such an occasion should never present itself, comfort your mind with this reflection, that though in single life your joys may not be very many, your sorrows, at least, will not be more than you can bear. Marriage may change your circumstances for the better, but, in my private opinion, it is far more likely to produce a contrary result.”
Anne Brontë, The Tenant of Wildfell Hall
“I would rather have your friendship than the love of any other woman in the world.”
Anne Brontë, The Tenant of Wildfell Hall
“If you would have your son to walk honorably through the world, you must not attempt to clear the stones from his path, but teach him to walk firmly over them - not insist upon leading him by the hand, but let him learn to go alone.”
Anne Brontë, The Tenant of Wildfell Hall
“I always lacked common sense when taken by surprise.”
Anne Brontë, Agnes Grey
“Keep a guard over your eyes and ears as the inlets of your heart, and over your lips as the outlet, lest they betray you in a moment of unwariness. Receive, coldly and dispassionately, every attention, till you have ascertained and duly considered the worth of the aspirant; and let your affections be consequent upon approbation alone. First study; then approve; then love. Let your eyes be blind to all external attractions, your ears deaf to all the fascinations of flattery and light discourse. - These are nothing - and worse than nothing - snares and wiles of the tempter, to lure the thoughtless to their own destruction. Principle is the first thing, after all; and next to that, good sense, respectability, and moderate wealth. If you should marry the handsomest, and most accomplished and superficially agreeable man in the world, you little know the misery that would overwhelm you if, after all, you should find him to be a worthless reprobate, or even an impracticable fool.”
Anne Brontë, The Tenant of Wildfell Hall
“He never could have loved me, or he would not have resigned me so willingly”
Anne Brontë, The Tenant of Wildfell Hall
“The end of Religion is not to teach us how to die, but how to live....”
Anne Brontë, Agnes Grey
“I wished to tell the truth, for truth always conveys its own moral to those who are able to receive it.”
Anne Bronte, The Tenant of Wildfell Hall Volume I
“There is such a thing as looking through a person's eyes into the heart, and learning more of the height, and breadth, and depth of another's soul in one hour than it might take you a lifetime to discover, if he or she were not disposed to reveal it, or if you had not the sense to understand it.”
Anne Brontë, The Tenant of Wildfell Hall

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